Action Verbs For Thesis Statements

Awesome Action Verbs

When writing a thesis statement, main assertion, or analysis, only use language that both conveys the meaning of your argument and makes your argument more sophisticated. Use this list of awesome action verbs to strengthen your writing.

Use the present tense form of the AA Verb. Ex.: The author reinforces the reader's enduring sense of injustice through the cruel characterization of the protagonist.

ExpoundExpandAssumeJustifyIronizeMultiplyDenounceAccount
IlluminateReviewPerceiveLinkAddressDiagnoseAgreeCensure
ExposeProblematizeDetectManipulateContendPositionGuideConfigure
DepictDescendInformInstructIsolateSucceedMaintainPersuade
RenderInterpretContradictChallengeRespondReinforceAllegePresent
ConflictEnableExposeConcealPronounceAnalyzeCharacterizeBolster
InstigateCoachExamineProbeDetachConjectureAdaptStudy
QuestionBroadenRecallClarifyInvestigateEvaluateDistinguishEcho
ScrutinizeHighlightAmplifyDismissCraftConfirmEmphasizeIntensify
AlterAttainDisproveUnderscoreReconfigureElevateDiscussVerify
FocusRemainConflatePositDivulgeFeatureDerideNegate
ObscureCreateAccentuateShroudDiscloseDisguiseGenerateAttest
AuthorizeEnforceTriggerFashionInitiateDramatizeConceiveRationalize
FormShapeIllustrateAugmentTreatConstructTransformRepresent
IdentifyCarryConstructTransformRepresentIdentifyCarryDeconstruct
FrameExplainWitnessValidateReconstructSupportProveAttribute
EngageBuildSustainDemonstrateArrangeElaborateProduceSuggest
ExhibitEvokeCondenseInventProposeDisplayAdvanceConnect
CondemnImplyExpressDismantleDefyClaimInsinuateReveal
ArgueDivulgeHintIndicateEstablishEnableWarpObstruct
SignifyOfferExploreMisconceiveVeilDenoteExistNegotiate
GraspDisputeConnotePortrayMediateRecognizeRenounceCritique
DescribeSimulateAscribeCriticize InterrogateCauseDenounceAssign
ConsiderSituateExemplifyOrganizeShapeAccessAssertEpitomize
WorkAcceptHeightenComplicateEmbodyPrioritizeRadicalizeFail
AssociateExplicateProduceNavigateReferInsistInstructCounteract

Your thesis will probably change as you write, so you will need to modify it to reflect exactly what you have discussed in your essay. Remember from Chapter 8 “The Writing Process: How Do I Begin?” that your thesis statement begins as a working thesis statement, an indefinite statement that you make about your topic early in the writing process for the purpose of planning and guiding your writing.

Working thesis statements often become stronger as you gather information and form new opinions and reasons for those opinions. Revision helps you strengthen your thesis so that it matches what you have expressed in the body of the paper.

Ways to Revise Your Thesis

You can cut down on irrelevant aspects and revise your thesis by taking the following steps:

1. Pinpoint and replace all nonspecific words, such as people, everything, society, or life, with more precise words in order to reduce any vagueness.

Working thesis: Young people have to work hard to succeed in life.

Revised thesis: Recent college graduates must have discipline and persistence in order to find and maintain a stable job in which they can use and be appreciated for their talents.

The revised thesis makes a more specific statement about success and what it means to work hard. The original includes too broad a range of people and does not define exactly what success entails. By replacing those general words like people and work hard, the writer can better focus his or her research and gain more direction in his or her writing.

2. Clarify ideas that need explanation by asking yourself questions that narrow your thesis.

Working thesis: The welfare system is a joke.

Revised thesis: The welfare system keeps a socioeconomic class from gaining employment by alluring members of that class with unearned income, instead of programs to improve their education and skill sets.

A joke means many things to many people. Readers bring all sorts of backgrounds and perspectives to the reading process and would need clarification for a word so vague. This expression may also be too informal for the selected audience. By asking questions, the writer can devise a more precise and appropriate explanation for joke. The writer should ask himself or herself questions similar to the 5WH questions. (See Chapter 8 “The Writing Process: How Do I Begin?” for more information on the 5WH questions.) By incorporating the answers to these questions into a thesis statement, the writer more accurately defines his or her stance, which will better guide the writing of the essay.

3. Replace any linking verbs with action verbs. Linking verbs are forms of the verb to be, a verb that simply states that a situation exists.

Working thesis: Kansas City schoolteachers are not paid enough.

Revised thesis: The Kansas City legislature cannot afford to pay its educators, resulting in job cuts and resignations in a district that sorely needs highly qualified and dedicated teachers.

The linking verb in this working thesis statement is the word are. Linking verbs often make thesis statements weak because they do not express action. Rather, they connect words and phrases to the second half of the sentence. Readers might wonder, “Why are they not paid enough?” But this statement does not compel them to ask many more questions. The writer should ask himself or herself questions in order to replace the linking verb with an action verb, thus forming a stronger thesis statement, one that takes a more definitive stance on the issue:

  • Who is not paying the teachers enough?
  • What is considered “enough”?
  • What is the problem?
  • What are the results

4. Omit any general claims that are hard to support.

Working thesis: Today’s teenage girls are too sexualized.

Revised thesis: Teenage girls who are captivated by the sexual images on MTV are conditioned to believe that a woman’s worth depends on her sensuality, a feeling that harms their self-esteem and behavior.

It is true that some young women in today’s society are more sexualized than in the past, but that is not true for all girls. Many girls have strict parents, dress appropriately, and do not engage in sexual activity while in middle school and high school. The writer of this thesis should ask the following questions:

  • Which teenage girls?
  • What constitutes “too” sexualized?
  • Why are they behaving that way?
  • Where does this behavior show up?
  • What are the repercussions?

Exercise 3

In the first section of Chapter 8 “The Writing Process: How Do I Begin?”, you determined your purpose for writing and your audience. You then completed a freewriting exercise about an event you recently experienced and chose a general topic to write about. Using that general topic, you then narrowed it down by answering the 5WH questions. After you answered these questions, you chose one of the three methods of prewriting and gathered possible supporting points for your working thesis statement.

Now, on a separate sheet of paper, write down your working thesis statement. Identify any weaknesses in this sentence and revise the statement to reflect the elements of a strong thesis statement. Make sure it is specific, precise, arguable, demonstrable, forceful, and confident.

Collaboration

Please share with a classmate and compare your answers.

Writing at Work

In your career you may have to write a project proposal that focuses on a particular problem in your company, such as reinforcing the tardiness policy. The proposal would aim to fix the problem; using a thesis statement would clearly state the boundaries of the problem and tell the goals of the project. After writing the proposal, you may find that the thesis needs revision to reflect exactly what is expressed in the body. Using the techniques from this chapter would apply to revising that thesis.

Key Takeaways

  • Proper essays require a thesis statement to provide a specific focus and suggest how the essay will be organized.
  • A thesis statement is your interpretation of the subject, not the topic itself.
  • A strong thesis is specific, precise, forceful, confident, and is able to be demonstrated.
  • A strong thesis challenges readers with a point of view that can be debated and can be supported with evidence.
  • A weak thesis is simply a declaration of your topic or contains an obvious fact that cannot be argued.
  • Depending on your topic, it may or may not be appropriate to use first person point of view.
  • Revise your thesis by ensuring all words are specific, all ideas are exact, and all verbs express action.

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